Sensibilities 2.4: Time & space

January 25, 2018

Welcome back to Sensibilities -- and a happy several-weeks-old new year besides! Here's some of the far-ranging resources, ideas, and inspirations that have been bouncing around in our heads this month, in the hopes that they pique your interest, jumpstart your creativity, or simply add a little intrigue to your day. Happy exploring!

 

 

1 is the fantastic, fantastical, and hilarious self-portraits of Kimiko Nishimoto, an 89-year-old photographer who started taking photographs at age 72:
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​​​on Instagram / more about her work

 


2 is Folded Wisdom, an archive of thousands of notes written and sketched by Bob Guest for his children over the course of their school days:
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more notes / more about the project

 


3 is Sensory Maps, a project by researcher/artist/designer Kate McClean that engages curious volunteers to explore and catalogue the smells of cities around the world:
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 more about the project / some smellwalk pointers

 

 

4 is a peek into the personal pep talks of seminal Afrofuturist science fiction author Octavia E. Butler:
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more about her & her influence / an exhibition on her notes, life & work

 


5 is a study by the University of Turin that digs into the subtle differences between salami made with commercial starter cultures and salami allowed to ferment naturally:

 

"At the beginning of the experiment, Luca Cocolin, a professor of microbiology at University of Turin, and his colleagues had a local salami manufacturer create two batches, using pork, lard, pepper, coriander, nutmeg, wine and other ingredients according to their usual recipe. A starter was added to one batch and not to the other, and after the filling was packed into sausage casings and hung up to ferment, the researchers checked in on the microbes three, seven, and 40 days later.

 

"What they saw was an explosive growth in the starter bacteria, to the exclusion of almost any other type. Very soon, they began to produce molecules that are usually made later on in the fermentation process, suggesting that having little competition had perhaps allowed them to jump the gun. In contrast, a rainbow of species cropped up more gradually in the other salami, generating a correspondingly more complex — and apparently more pleasant — array of scent and flavor molecules." -- the NYTimes


in their own words

 

 

enjoy!

:) devan


 

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